Long Live Containerization!
Node.js is a popular, open source development platform that lets you run JavaScript code on the server side. Node is useful for developing applications that require a persistent connection from the browser to the server and is often used for real-time applications and single-page applications.
Node.js runs on a dedicated HTTP server and is designed to use a single thread in one process at a time. Node.js applications are event-driven and calls are asynchronous by default. Node.js applications do not follow the traditional process of receiving a request, processing it and returning a response. Instead, Node uses an event stack to handle incoming requests, pooling requests and dispatching them one after the other without waiting for a response.
Kubernetes is an open source platform for managing Linux containers in private, public and hybrid cloud environments. Many DevOps teams use Kubernetes to manage their microservices architecture, where each microservice is encapsulated in one or more containers. Kubernetes also supports a GitOps development model in which all changes to a Kubernetes cluster are fully automated and managed in source control.
Containers and Kubernetes can be deployed on-premises and in all public clouds, making them an ideal platform for cloud-native applications that need to scale quickly and must be portable between environments.
Application developers, IT system administrators and DevOps engineers use Kubernetes to automatically deploy, scale, maintain, schedule and operate multiple application containers on a cluster of nodes. Containers run on a shared operating system but are isolated from each other.
Kubernetes makes it possible to create a cluster of hosts running Linux containers and manage large numbers of containers running on those hosts. 
You can deploy any application on Kubernetes, but there are certain things you can do to adapt your applications to a containerized environment. Here is how to make a Node.js application better-suited to Kubernetes:
To deploy a Node.js application to Docker or Kubernetes, you first need to build a container image. To do this, you usually start with an existing image and add additional layers of functionality as needed.
When building Node.js applications, the community provides several official Docker images to help you get started. These images provide Node.js binaries on top of an existing Linux distribution (typically Debian or Alpine). You can start from these official images and add your application as an additional layer.
There are three types of official Node.js images:
Starting from your base image, you will use a Dockerfile to build a custom image containing your application. The following is the simplest possible Dockerfile, which copies your Node.js application (app.js) into an official Node.js container image.
FROM node : 12.13.1
EXPOSE 3000
COPY app.js .
CMD node app.js
To build an image from the Dockerfile, place the file in the directory containing your application code and run the following command:
docker build -t myImage:new
This will create a Docker image named myImage with the label new based on the contents of the current directory.
To make this image usable by Kubernetes, you need to publish it to the registry. You can then run and test your application in Docker or Kubernetes.
The typical way to deploy an application to Kubernetes is via a Deployment object. Here is an example of a Deployment object that deploys two replicas of the container image we defined previously: myImage with the label new.
apiVersion: apps/v1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
    name: myImage
    labels:
        app: myImage
spec:
    replicas: 2
    selector:
        matchLabels:
            app: myImage
    template:
        metadata:
            labels:
                app: myImage
        spec:
            containers:
           —name: myImage
               image: myImage:new
               imagePullPolicy: Never
               args:
 
Once this YAML is in place, you can run this command to create the Deployment in your Kubernetes cluster:
kubectl apply -f deployment.yaml
The last step is to allow other components and users to access your application. To this end, you will need to define two more Kubernetes objects: A Service and an Ingress. These are outside the scope of this article, but you can learn more about them in the Kubernetes documentation. 
You deploy the Service and Ingress using these commands:
kubectl apply -f service.yaml
kubectl apply -f ingress.yaml
Once you understand the basics of Kubernetes deployment, a more convenient way to package and deploy your application is by using Helm charts. Helm is a Kubernetes package manager, and a Helm chart is a template that includes all the components we saw above: A Deployment, Service and Ingress, and ensures they are deployed correctly in one step. 
In this article, I explained the basics of Kubernetes and showed basic requirements for deploying Node.js web applications to a Kubernetes cluster. I showed how to deploy your first Node.js application to Kubernetes in six steps:
I hope this will be useful as you learn to deploy your Node.js projects to a modern cloud-native environment.
Gilad David Maayan is a technology writer who has worked with over 150 technology companies including SAP, Samsung NEXT, NetApp and Imperva, producing technical and thought leadership content that elucidates technical solutions for developers and IT leadership.
Gilad David Mayaan has 6 posts and counting. See all posts by Gilad David Mayaan
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